bio

Roy Pickering was born into the North Nottinghamshire mining community at Welbeck in 1954.
Son of pit worker and photographer Ron Pickering.
Studied painting at Birmingham Polytechnic in the 1970′s.
Lived and worked in London 1987-2003. Numerous education projects and residencies.
Taught in further and higher education, and part time at the Tate Galleries in London, since 1989.

Current studios in Nottinghamshire and London. Exhibited work regularly for more than 35 years, with work in many private and public collections. Most recent exhibitions at Gallery Cork Street, London, with Charles Hustwick in 2010 ; National Museum of Kenya, Nairobi 2011 ; Otwarta Pracownia, Krakow & Vitcak/Artnews Gallery, Warsaw 2014 ; Djanogly Gallery, Lakeside, University of Nottingham 2016.

Previous figurative work was centred around the themes of family and family history.
Previous landscape projects include the Cambridgeshire fens, and two Kenya series in 1986 and 1997.
Returned to Sherwood Forest in 2003. Began the Welbeck Project.

Roy Pickering is founder and director of Quarrylab, an artist development and support programme.

 

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Living Ancients

The manager at the Sherwood Forest Centre, Izi Banton, very kindly showed me some of her favourite old oak trees. Some are well known like the Major Oak and Medusa. Some of the oldest living things on earth, all 600 to 1000 years old – ‘Living Ancients’. When it warms up a bit I’ll go back to each one and get to know them better, and maybe do some tree portraits.                                                                                                                                                              FallenStumpyMedusaBootMECT Next Gen

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Old Landscapes

Some landscapes from 1986 I just found in my old studio. Kenya, mixed media on paper. Strikes me they are similar to the ones I’m doing now. The volcanic Mount Longonot becomes the quarry slag heap – it all comes out of the ground one way or another.

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Warsaw : Vitkac – Artnews

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A big thank you to all the wonderful people who helped me get this show on the road, and made it such a success. Especially to Kasia, Leszek and Alicja at Vitkac ; Kasia and the staff at Artnews who were brilliant ; not forgetting our crack art handling team Roy E and Kristof ; the lovely Maryjka Beckman who really got the ball rolling when we all met at her house in Kenya three years ago ; and Veronica, my constant support and driving force – thanks x.
I do feel that now I have a special relationship with Poland. Krakow and Warsaw and both beautiful and fascinating cities.
The drive out there was fun, but driving back seemed a long way and we were tired and desperate to get home. I now feel like battening down the hatches and just getting on with some work over winter.

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Otwarta Pracownia

IMG_1631I’m relieved to say we arrived in Krakow on Wednesday evening after a drive of nearly 1200 miles, all the work intact. A long journey, from Rotterdam to Berlin, then to Krakow the next day. Lots of pine forests, and near Katowice, some coal mines. The last 100km through fog and rain.

Thursday morning we hung the show with the help of two great guys, Kristof and Iggy, directors of Otwarta Pracownia. I’m really happy with how it looks. I left out one or two paintings that I had planned to show, and maybe included a couple of surprises (to myself). This often happens when considering the space and how the works are going fit together. I now know for example that the Warsaw leg will be somewhat different to Krakow. Here are some photos from the vernissage on Friday. A great turn out and great evening. A big thanks to Kristof Klimek and everyone at Otwarta Pracowia for all their hard work, and special thanks to Leszek and Kasia Likus, our friends and sponsors in Poland for their amazing hospitality.

So, the first part of our Poland adventure is under way. Next we move everything to Warsaw on the 19th.

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Studio

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A few pictures of the big studio at Kirklington – the Cowshed where I can do large work, mainly in summer (it’s freezing in winter), and the winter studio at home (garden shed) which is nice and cosy and overlooks the field I’ve been painting for a couple of years.

This week I’ve been finally moving work out of my old studio at our house in London. In truth I haven’t worked in there for a number of years, and now the house is being sold so I have to go through all the old stuff and sort it out. Now the website is up and running it’s a good time to catalogue everything and I can make an archive section showing a few images of past work. This could take a while but I’m looking forward to doing that, and i’ll try and add a bit at a time.

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Forthcoming exhibition Poland, October 2014

For the next few weeks I’m going to be busy getting ready to take some paintings to Poland at the end of September. I’ve already done the work, it’s a matter of choosing what to take and working out the logistics etc. I’m doing exhibitions in two very different kinds of exhibition spaces, one in Krakow and one in Warsaw. So curating the two shows will present very different challenges.

The gallery in Krakow, Otwarta Prakovnia, is an artist run space for exhibitions, meetings and other art events. It’s in an old building full of character, with intimate spaces.

By contrast, the Vitkac building in Warsaw is brand new glass clad construction housing designer shops, restaurants, galleries and conference rooms. The space is big and has high walls. I can take some big paintings, possibly quite a few small ones, and some big drawings I think, that should be a good representation of what I’ve done in the last three or four years.

But although I’ve been there a couple of times it’s quite difficult to envisage how things will look. Fortunately there are lots of people over there helping out with publicity, transport etc. I’ve never shown work in Poland before so it’s a new adventure for, very exciting and I’m really looking forward to it.